Miracles

thatscienceguy:

Strange, Wonderful, and Beautiful organisms:

  1. Chromodoris Willani Blue (blue sea slug)
  2. Stemonitis fusca
  3. Coral
  4. Squidworm
  5. Sunda Colugo
  6. Christmas Tree Worm
  7. Panda Ant

mindblowingscience:

A Salad Bar for the Space Station

Freeze-dried bags of dehydrated “astronaut food” may seem like a fun novelty for school kids on Earth, but despite all the hard work that goes into providing the residents of the Space Station with nutritious and varied meal options there’s one thing that remains a rare and elusive commodity on astronauts’ menus: fresh produce.

Although fruit and vegetables do occasionally find their way aboard the ISS via resupply missions (to the delight of the crew) researchers are moving one step closer to actually having a vegetable garden in orbit. On Monday, April 14, NASA’s Veg-01 experiment will launch to the ISS aboard a SpaceX Dragon capsule to test the in-flight viability of an expandable plant growth chamber named “Veggie.”

In development for several years, Veggie is now getting its chance to be space-tested with the launch of the SpaceX-3 resupply mission. Veggie uses clear collapsible “pillows” as miniature greenhouses, inside which plants can be grown with the aid of root-mats and a bank of LED lights.

Astronauts will see how well “Outredgeous” romaine lettuce fares in microgravity inside the Veg-01 experiment, and can also use the LED bank as a light source for other experiments.

“Veggie will provide a new resource for U.S. astronauts and researchers as we begin to develop the capabilities of growing fresh produce and other large plants on the space station,” said Gioia Massa, the NASA payload scientist for Veggie.

“Determining food safety is one of our primary goals for this validation test.”

While other plant-growth experiments are currently aboard ISS, Veggie boasts the simplest design and largest growing area of any of them to date.

With the ultimate success of Veggie, ISS astronauts may soon find themselves floating in line at the in-house salad bar. (Watch out for those rogue croutons!)

Read more in the NASA news article by Linda Herridge here, and learn more about the Veggie project here.

yahoonewsphotos:

Human body parts grown in a lab

In a north London hospital, scientists are growing noses, ears and blood vessels in the laboratory in a bold attempt to make body parts using stem cells.

It is among several labs around the world, including in the U.S., that are working on the futuristic idea of growing custom-made organs in the lab.

While only a handful of patients have received the British lab-made organs so far— including tear ducts, blood vessels and windpipes — researchers hope they will soon be able to transplant more types of body parts into patients, including what would be the world’s first nose made partly from stem cells. (AP)

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(via howstuffworks)

awkwardsituationist:

tsingy de bemaraha national park, a unesco world heritage site in western madagascar, is home to lemurs who, with thick pads on their hands and feet, navigate this six hundred square kilometer labyrinth of three hundred foot tall razor sharp limestone pillars.

photographer stephen alvarez (previously featured) remarked, “it’s an unbelievable experience to watch them [as] they jump like acrobats from the sharp pinnacles” — a feat made more remarkable given the vast chasm bellow.

in the malagasy language, tsingy means “where one cannot walk barefoot,” and alvarez noted that given the difficulty of the terrain, it takes an entire day to walk half a mile.

nearly impenetrable, the area is described as a refuge within paradise. lemurs, like ninety percent of the species in madagascar, are endemic to the island, and thanks to the isolation of the refuge have evolved into tsingy’s eleven distinct species, including the decken’s sifaka seen here.

vicemag:

A Visit to Moscow’s Brain Institute, Where Stalin’s Brain Is Kept in a Jar
On April 14, 1930, the Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky committed suicide in his Moscow apartment. His closest friends, including the writer Yuri Olesha, rushed to the flat when they heard the terrible news.
As they sat in silence in the living room, a cracking sound suddenly emitted from the bedroom where Mayakovsky’s body lay.
“Only wood, it seemed, could be chopped like that,” Olesha later wrote. Someone was cutting through the wall with an axe. Moments later, a doctor in a white lab coat ran by carrying a washbasin.
Inside it was the poet’s brain.
The doctor told Mayakovsky’s friends that the brain was unusually large—more than 3.75 pounds—before loading it into a car and driving away.
Mayakovsky’s brain was taken to a brick building called the Brain Institute, which was founded by the Bolsheviks in 1928 as part of the effort to canonize Lenin. Lenin’s brain joined those of other proclaimed geniuses in a “Pantheon of Brains,” which displayed the Soviet Union’s finest minds in glass cases. The institute went on to dissect the brains of dozens of famous Soviets, including those of Sergei Eisenstein, Maxim Gorky, and Joseph Stalin. The brain-cataloging continued all the way until 1989, when the fall of the USSR put an end to this peculiar experiment.
Since then, the Institute remains open, but few reporters, Russian or foreign, have been allowed to visit. In recent years, the Institute has been trying to distance itself from the past and adopt a new reputation for modern neurological research—and catching a glimpse of Lenin’s brain in pieces might make its newfound credibility a hard sell. To my delight, however, as part of their effort to show the world how legitimate they’ve become, the Institute let me inside.
Continue

vicemag:

A Visit to Moscow’s Brain Institute, Where Stalin’s Brain Is Kept in a Jar

On April 14, 1930, the Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky committed suicide in his Moscow apartment. His closest friends, including the writer Yuri Olesha, rushed to the flat when they heard the terrible news.

As they sat in silence in the living room, a cracking sound suddenly emitted from the bedroom where Mayakovsky’s body lay.

“Only wood, it seemed, could be chopped like that,” Olesha later wrote. Someone was cutting through the wall with an axe. Moments later, a doctor in a white lab coat ran by carrying a washbasin.

Inside it was the poet’s brain.

The doctor told Mayakovsky’s friends that the brain was unusually large—more than 3.75 pounds—before loading it into a car and driving away.

Mayakovsky’s brain was taken to a brick building called the Brain Institute, which was founded by the Bolsheviks in 1928 as part of the effort to canonize Lenin. Lenin’s brain joined those of other proclaimed geniuses in a “Pantheon of Brains,” which displayed the Soviet Union’s finest minds in glass cases. The institute went on to dissect the brains of dozens of famous Soviets, including those of Sergei Eisenstein, Maxim Gorky, and Joseph Stalin. The brain-cataloging continued all the way until 1989, when the fall of the USSR put an end to this peculiar experiment.

Since then, the Institute remains open, but few reporters, Russian or foreign, have been allowed to visit. In recent years, the Institute has been trying to distance itself from the past and adopt a new reputation for modern neurological research—and catching a glimpse of Lenin’s brain in pieces might make its newfound credibility a hard sellTo my delight, however, as part of their effort to show the world how legitimate they’ve become, the Institute let me inside.

Continue

(via laboratoryequipment)

coolsciencegifs:

Frog legs dance when salt is sprinkled on them
A frog’s muscles do not succumb to rigor mortis as quickly as most warm-blooded animals which makes it possible for the muscles to move post-mortem if energy is applied to them some how. This can be done either by cooking (heat/energy) or by salting (ions).Salt,also known as NaCl, can work like electricity because it is made up of ions (Sodium and Chlorine to be exact) and ions carry an electrical charge. In living animals, sodium delivers a signal to cause muscles to contract.
The frog legs in the video are fresh so energy (ATP) is still stored in the cells. When the electrical impulse is applied, the legs contract even though the frog is dead!Of course this doesn’t apply to only frog legs!
Gif source
text source

coolsciencegifs:

Frog legs dance when salt is sprinkled on them

A frog’s muscles do not succumb to rigor mortis as quickly as most warm-blooded animals which makes it possible for the muscles to move post-mortem if energy is applied to them some how. This can be done either by cooking (heat/energy) or by salting (ions).

Salt,also known as NaCl, can work like electricity because it is made up of ions (Sodium and Chlorine to be exact) and ions carry an electrical charge. In living animals, sodium delivers a signal to cause muscles to contract.


The frog legs in the video are fresh so energy (ATP) is still stored in the cells. When the electrical impulse is applied, the legs contract even though the frog is dead!

Of course this doesn’t apply to only frog legs!

Gif source

text source

(via thescienceofreality)

laboratoryequipment:

Body Heat Charges GeneratorWearable computers or devices have been hailed as the next generation of mobile electronic gadgets, from smart watches, to smart glasses to smart pacemakers. For electronics to be worn by a user, they must be light, flexible and equipped with a power source, which could be a portable, long-lasting battery or no battery at all but a generator. How to supply power in a stable and reliable manner is one of the most critical issues to commercialize wearable devices.A team of The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) researchers headed by Byung Cho, a professor of electrical engineering, proposed a solution to this problem by developing a glass fabric-based thermoelectric (TE) generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm. There are no changes in performance even if the generator bends upward and downward for up to 120 cycles.Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/body-heat-charges-generator

laboratoryequipment:

Body Heat Charges Generator

Wearable computers or devices have been hailed as the next generation of mobile electronic gadgets, from smart watches, to smart glasses to smart pacemakers. For electronics to be worn by a user, they must be light, flexible and equipped with a power source, which could be a portable, long-lasting battery or no battery at all but a generator. How to supply power in a stable and reliable manner is one of the most critical issues to commercialize wearable devices.

A team of The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) researchers headed by Byung Cho, a professor of electrical engineering, proposed a solution to this problem by developing a glass fabric-based thermoelectric (TE) generator that is extremely light and flexible and produces electricity from the heat of the human body. In fact, it is so flexible that the allowable bending radius of the generator is as low as 20 mm. There are no changes in performance even if the generator bends upward and downward for up to 120 cycles.

Read more: http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/04/body-heat-charges-generator